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20121201
20121231
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KQED (PBS) 40
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English 40
Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)
has warned u.s. lawmakers, they have a duty to solve. we sat down with her here in washington. >> christine lagarde, the fiscal cliff, how concerned are they about the ramifications? >> people around the world are concerned about it. it appears to be the case there was more concerned about the eurozone than the fiscal cliff. now things have changed and there is more concerned about the fiscal cliff. they asked about a resolution. >> what could the impact speed? we are looking at a time when the global recovery is fragile at best. >> of u.s. is 20% of the global economy. if the u.s. suffers as a result of a fiscal cliff, a complete wiping out of its growth is going to have repercussions around the world. probably half of that. if the u.s. economy has less growth, it will probably be 1% less in mexico, canada, probably less so in europe and japan. but there will be a ripple effects. >> are you worried about it? >> yes. of course i worry about it. the u.s. is a big chunk of the global economy. it has often been a driver of growth. and to have that player virtually flat, if not in
$1.9 billion to settle u.s. allegations of money laundering. our chief economics correspondent has all the details. >> the largest bank in money- laundering, cartels washed through the bank. it resulted in a $1.9 billion fine, the biggest in u.s. banking history. the american authorities >> the corruption of the financial system by drug traffickers and other criminals, and free evading u.s. sanctions and law. >> they find $7 billion will be transferred between mexico and the u.s.. there were 25,000 transactions involving iran. in $290 million in suspicious traveler's checks were cleared by the bank. in a statement, they said they were story -- sorry for past mistakes. the former chairman was appointed as trade minister for david cameron. he had this to say when the allegations emerged in july. >> there were failures of the implementation, they expressed regret for that. it is a company i am proud to have worked for. >> they are not the only british bank to run these. the accusations of sanctions violations. other leading european banks have also in recent years reached settlements
. there was six adults pronounced dead at the scene. the shooter is deceased. >> u.s. networks say that the killer was a man and his 20's his mother was thought to be a teacher at the school. in washington, where the flag flies at half mast, barack obama addressed the nation as a president and a father. >> the majority of those who died today were children. beautiful little kids between the ages of 5 and 10 years old. they had their entire lives ahead of them -- birthdays, graduations, weddings, kids of their own. this among the fallen also teachers, men and women who devoted their lives to helping our children fulfill their dreams. our hearts are broken. >> he demanded meaningful action, a hint at perhaps tighter gun laws. that argument is for tomorrow. for now, america is trying to comprehend the how and why of the mass killings and a small rural community. new town was supposed to be a haven, a world away from the bustle of nearby new york. today, the elementary school was robbed of it and since joining colorblind and virginia tech of the grim roll call of loss. -- joining columbine and virgini
less. >> warner: and we talk with ambassador marc grossman about prospects for afghanistan as the u.s. prepares to withdraw troops by 2014 and as he leaves his post as u.s. special envoy to the region. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: violence continued across syria today as the united states welcomed a russian admission that syria's rebels may succeed in overthrowing president bashar al-assad. syrian state television showed >> woodruff: for more on all of this we turn to vitaly churkin, russia's ambassador to the united nations. thank you for joining us. let me begin by asking you about the comment today made by your deputy foreign minister mr. bog don november. he said today "it is impossible to exclude a victory of the syrian opposition." how would you describe
prospects for afghanistan as the u.s. prepares to withdraw troops by 2014 and as he leaves his post as u.s. special envoy to the region. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: violence continued across syria today as the united states welcomed a russian admission that syria's rebels may succeed in overthrowing president bashar al-assad. we may have a problem with that tape and we apologize. we'll try and get it together. if we're not able to -- we're going to go ahead and interview right now mr. vitaly churkin. he is russia's ambassador to the united
week of january, the u.s. economy will be hit by $600 billion of automatic tax increases. and automatic spending cuts. the phenomenon known as the fiscal cliff. if that happens, it will trigger a recession, or worse. so, president obama is taking action and insisting that republicans agree to increase the existing marginal tax rates on the wealthiest top 2% of u.s. taxpayers. and of course, there is more to the deal. but there will be no negotiations on that big part of the deal unless that tax on the wealthiest 2% is negotiated now. the president could not be more emphatic in stressing the indispensable element of surmounting the cliff is that super-rich revenue. >> we're not insisting on rates just out of spite. or out of any kind of partisan bickering. but rather because we need to raise a certain amount of revenue. >> okay. here is john boehner, the republican house speaker. >> if you look at the plans that the white house have talked about thus far, they couldn't pass either house of the congress. >> republicans proposed raising $800 billion in extra revenues. and that revenue shou
head-on way than most countries. >> rose: including the united states? >> well, i think in the u.s. -- obviously you've got your own decisions to make about your fiscal problems and your issues and obviously your president and congress are engaging in that at the moment. but in the u.k. we have done that, we have got ahead of the curve and you can see in measures, for example, of how competitive the economies are, the you can is steadily becoming more and more competitive. >> rose: there's also this, the united states is engaged in this great debate that's going on in the white house with speaker of the house john boehner and the president of the united states, barack obama. what would be the optimal outcome of that debate as you look at it as a man who's dealing with the same kinds of problems? >> i'd say two things. one is we do need a resolution of this problem. i think the most immediate short-term problem facing the world economy-- i stress the word short term" is the u.s. fiscal cliff. i think if that is not resolved that is going to cause considerable problem for the world a
,965. the nasdaq fell eight points to close at 3002. a number of automakers posted strong u.s. sales in november, among them chrysler, ford, and toyota. chrysler and toyota reported sales increases in the double digits, over a year ago. ford sales rose more than 6%, but g.m. reported only a 3% increase. volkswagen had its best november since 1973. in syria, the u.n. announced it is pulling out non-essential international staff for their own safety. those who remain will be restricted to the capital city, damascus. separately, the u.s. voiced mounting concern about activity at syrian government sites storing chemical weapons. this afternoon, president obama warned syrian leader bashar al- assad not to cross that line. oday i want to make it absolutely clear to assad and those under his command, the world is watching. the use of chemical weapons is and would be totally unacceptable. and if you make the tragic mistake of using these weapons, there will be consequences. and you will be held accountable. >> sreenivasan: in response, syria's government released a statement saying it would never use ch
headlines around the globe. conflicteteriorating -- concerns that the u.s. -- that the government will use chemical weapons. >> i want to make it clear that the world is watching. the use of chemical weapons is and would be totally unacceptable. >> centuries after ernest shackleton to the death defying journey, a new team is out to repeat the trip, minus any modern conveniences. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and also around the globe. it is an announcement many have been waiting for. today's news that the duchess of cambridge is expecting a child was greeted with delight and concern. from around the world, congratulations have been pouring in for the royal couple, including well wishes from the white house. the 30-year-old duchess is suffering from severe morning sickness. she has been hospitalized for several days. our royal correspondent starts our coverage. >> departing from hospital this evening, the father to be. william had spent several hours with his wife. they had driven to london earlier together. it was earlier this week and that the sickness st
, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: iran claimed today it has captured a u.s. surveillance drone. the "scan-eagle" is used to collect photographic and video images. iranian state television broadcast video of two military commanders examining the aircraft. they said it was seized "in the past few days," but they did not specify where or how. in response, the u.s. navy said none of its unmanned aerial vehicles-- u.a.v.'s-- are missing. and in washington, white house spokesman jay carney raised doubts about tehran's statements. we have no evidence that the iranian claims you cite are true. i'd refer you to the pentagon's comments this morning for details about this particular type of u.a.v., but again we have no evidence that the iranian claims are true. >> sreenivasan: a year ago, iran did manage to down a c.i.a. drone that apparently crossed the border from afghanistan. and last month, the u.s. military said another drone came under fire by iran over the persian gulf. it was undamaged. in afghanistan, a bomb blast has killed two nato troops in the country's so
, president obama announced tuesday that the u.s. will now formally recognize the syrian opposition movement. >> we've made a decision that the syrian opposition coalition is now inclusive enough, is reflective and representative enough of the syrian population, >> ifill: hours later, the friends of syria meeting in marrakech, morocco took the same step. the u.s. became one of 114 nations to endorse the syrian national council created just last month under international pressure. deputy secretary of state william burns: >> in a growing number of towns and villages, a new syria is being born, the regime of bashar al assad must and will go, the sooner he steps aside the better for all syrians. >> ifill: despite showing signs last week of a possible shift in russia's position, the decision did not go down well in moscow, which opposes outside action against the assad regime. foreign minister sergei lavrov: >> ( translated ): as the coalition has been recognized as the only legitimate representative, it seems that the united states decided to place all bets on the armed victory of this very nati
administration and that was in syria. the u.s. stepped up missile defense along syria's border with turkey, hoping to stave off the potential use of chemical weapons against anti-assad rebels. for the first time the u.s. is formally recognizing rebels' attempt to overthrow president assad and we are at the end game, or are we? martha? >> i think we're closer then we have ever been certainly. i think even two weeks ago there were a lot of people saying this could be months and months and months. we have no idea when this will end. but i think if you look at where those rebels are advancing in damas cass, i think it really could end there. you've got suburbs. you're seeing this extraordinary video coming out of damascus with the suburbs virtually on fire. the thing i think is most frightening about this is everybody, the rebels, regime, everybody is just trying -- destroying everything in their path. then you get into the terrible thing with retribution. you have rebels advancing. you have regime fighting back. but i think asan has to be feeling the pressure. i think he's probably moving fro
or less than that? >> well, u.s. intelligence officials were watching very closely the movement of syrian forces and in also trying to divine the intentions of president assad. clearly the rebels in syria have had a very good few -- past few weeks and making advances on the capital of damascus and president assad really feels like his back may be up against the wall. but is he desperate enough now to play this card which would almost certainly draw some kind of western response. >> rose: one more time, the red line is simply moving the chemical weapons? >> well, this is interesting, charlie, because the president said either moving them or using them. today secretary of state clinton mentioned only using them. jay carney, the white house spokesman also repeated that phrase, did not mention the president's earlier condition about moving them around. so it's a little bit unclear whether the administration perhaps has changed its red line. >> rose: do you think the united states is thinking about doing this unilaterally or is this an action taking place in conjunction with other forces from
with the opposition. on the syrian diplomatic front, secretary of state hillary clinton said today russia and the u.s. will support new efforts to mediate peace. but clinton underscored that the u.s. still insists that president bashar assad leave power. she spoke today in northern ireland, a day after meeting with russian foreign minister sergei lavrov and the u.n. envoy for syria, lakhdar brahimi. >> we reviewed the very mr. brahimi had his own additional information to contribute about what he is hearing from sources inside syria and both minister lavrov and i committed to support a renewed push by brahimi and his team to work with all the stakeholders in syria to begin a political transition. meanwhile, rebels in syria made the damascus international airport an official battleground. they said it's a legitimate target and they urged civilians to stay clear. fighting near the airport and around the capital city has intensified in the past week. the latest amateur video showed street battles and a car set afire by a rocket attack. the exiled leader of hamas khaled meshaal entered gaza today for the
with a range of more than 60 miles. nato foreign ministers approved sending the missiles to turkey with the u.s., the netherlands, and germany providing the weapons but the alliance stressed the move was defensive. >> the deployment of patriot missiles will serve as an effective deterrent and that way, diaz with the situation along the syrian-turkish border. >> russia is the one fly in the right man. the foreign minister said he would not block the move. a sign an old ally may be losing patience with president assaad. they hope deploying missiles will help stabilize tensions but the bigger concern is what is happening inside syria itself. specifically, what the regime might do with its stockpile of chemical weapons. syria has used much of its considerable arsenal to crush the rebellion. hidden from view it is believed to have developed a chemical weapons program and there are reports of activity, prompting this uncompromising western message. >> we are concerned for the same reason the united states has. we have sent our own clear, private message directly to them about the serious consequences
. can the u.s. intervene? should we? covering the week -- jackie calmes of "new york times," eamon javers of cnbc, amy walter of abc news, and james kitfield of "national journal." >> award-winning reporting and analysis covering history as it happens. live from our nations capitol, this is washington week with gwen ifill, produced in association with national journal. corporate funding for washington week is provided by -- ♪ >> wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. >> we know why we're here. to charlotte a greater path, in the air and in our factories. >> to find cleaner, more efficient ways to power flight. >> and harness our technology for new energy solutions. >> around the globe, the people of boeing are working together to build a better tomorrow. >> that's why we're here. >> additional corporate funding is provided by prudential additional funding is also provided by the annenberg financial. foundation, the corporation for public broadcasting and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. tha
, which means it is a proxy battle field in their cold war. the u.s. faces a fleet here. all of that puts the bahrainis deeply inside the middle east pressure cooker. >> there are other forces and other people doing things that have deepened what has happened. there are national forces. >> you are saying iran? >> it can be iran. it can be others. and dissemination of sectarianism and hatred. we are doing our best to stop this. >> and bahrain is a barometer for the gulf. if the crisis cannot be solved by the country's politicians, bahrain will export trouble to the region, sharpening sectarianism and, a dangerous competition between the saudis and iran. >> killed a lot that is unresolved. the british government is to pay more than $3 million to in libyan dissident who claims the intelligence agency mi was involved in forcibly sending him back to libya, where he was tortured by the gadhafi's regime. britain said the payment is not when a mission of liability. the security situation in libya has changed since the shock assassination in september of the u.s. ambassadors and others. u.n. ambas
young immigrants in the u.s. illegally and seeking a reprieve from deportation. >> my values and customs are now american. so, you know, the idea of getting kicked out to korea and never come back to the u.s., i just can't even imagine this >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> warner: and we examine the growing turmoil in egypt on the eve of a referendum vote on a new constitution. >> one of the major-- has been one between islimus and nonover the future of egypt and the character of the nation >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. t
points to close at 1,374. the nasdaq rose 15 points to close at 2,989. the u.s. senate has overwhelmingly approved a bill normalizing trade relations with russia. but the measure also contained provisions to punish russian officials accused of human rights offenses-- a move the russian government has denounced. the house passed the legislation last month. president obama has pledged to sign it into law. it was all smiles today for the duchess of cambridge, as she left a london hospital. the former kate middleton was discharged after being treated for severe morning sickness. the duchess emerged with her husband, prince william, three days after being admitted. the hospital stay prompted royal officials to announce her pregnancy to the public. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to jeff. >> brown: and to egypt. within the last 24 hours the country has seen the worst violence since president mohamed morsi was elected in june. seven people were killed and more than 600 hurt during overnight clashes in cairo outside the presidential palace. we have a report from jonathan rugm
u.s.-allied countries also called for swift international action to end the bloodshed in syria.in in central asia, a military plane crashed early this morning in kazakhstan, killing 27in people, including the country's head of border security.ll the russian-made aircraft went down near the southern city of shymkent. the dead also included seven crew members and 19 border guards. there was no immediate word on the cause of the crash, but kazakhstan has been plagued by heavy winds and snow in recent weeks. the long-time actor charles durning died monday at his home in new york. he came to be known as the "king of the character actors" in a 50-year career that spanned 5 broadway, the movies and television. along the way, he earned two oscar nominations. one was for his role as the corrupt governor in "the best little whorehouse in texas" in 1982. i and in "tootsie," he played the9 unwitting suitor of dustin hoffman, who was posing as a female soap opera star. charles durning was 89 years old. those are some of the day's major stories. a now, back to gwen. >> ifill: we turn to poli
u.s. school would help prevent similar tragedies in the future. the bbc's north america editor reports. >> the church bells tolled out the exact time when a week ago a young man with an assault rifle began his massacre of children. they stood in prayer and in silence in the rain. in a town still numb, the bells tolled 26 times, one for each of the victims of the school. inside the white house, president obama and his staff since silent for a minute. beyond the grave, resolution. in a new video, he has promised he will push for a ban on assault rifles. >> i will do everything in my power as president to advance these efforts. if there's even one thing we can do as a country to protect our children, we have a responsibility to try. >> shame on the nra. >> there are those who blame the national rifle association for consistently, powerful lobbying against gun control. they have been consistently silent until now, and some expected they would seek compromise. none of it. instead, raw fury, blaming video games, the culture. >> we have blood-of films out there like "american psycho,"
security to the u.s. backing but he openly attacks u.s. allies accusing of america of fostering corruption in afghanistan. and worse turn coat of the year karzai. okay. most boring, pat? >> the alan green span joe lieberman trophy this year, john, goes to harry reid. >> on my side of the political agenda, mitch mcconnell is a winner. and i would also include jon huntsman, who i think had an opening to really make an impression in the republican primaries and he sure didn't. >> does mitch have a problem in kentucky? >> well, there is a singer who has her -- a senator who has her eye on his seat. >> what is she doing? >> clint eastwood's unbelievable gig at the republican convention that put he everybody to sleep and took the momentum out of that entire evening on television. >> how can you improve on that? >> i have a tie between clint eastwood's chair and donald trump. which way would you go? >> that's a tough one. most boring, the olympic opening ceremony. a showcase of all things british. harry potter, james bond, mary poppins. it paled in comparison to china's extravaganza. most charism
, if anything, the u.s. can do about it. >> woodruff: from florida, hari sreenivasan has the story of endangered coral reefs. many of them dying because ocean temperatures are rising and the waters are more acidic. >> i remember seeing fields of elk horn coral that you couldn't see through it and you couldn't see beyond it and those same areas are dead you know 99% dead. ♪ >> ifill: and we close with a remembrance of jazz great dave brubeck who died today, one day shy of his 92nd birthday. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: the nation's third- largest bank, citigroup, announced big job cuts as it continues to scale back in the wake of the financial crisis. the 11,000 employees to be laid off worldwide, make up about 4% of the company's workforce. more than 6,000 of those jobs are in consum
's square. and u.s. troops in afghanistan marked another holiday on the front lines with early christmas dinners. >> my family, however, this job comes with a price, many of the soldiers realize that price. even though we like to be with our families we realize the importance of what we're doing here and we believe in it. there also was another fatal shooting of an american in afghanistan today. a policewoman in kabul killed a u.s. civilian trainer who'd been working with the nato command. there've been more than 60 such "insider" attacks this year. this was the first committed by a woman. in syria, the u.n. envoy to syria met with president bashar al-assad in damascus, but he gave no sign of progress toward halting the civil war. lakhdar brahimi spoke with assad as part of a two-day visit. brahimi was appointed envoy in september, but he's made little apparent headway. the latest visit came a day after opposition groups reported a government air strike on a bakery killed at least 60 people. authorities in india restricted vehicle and railroad travel in new delhi today, in the wake of v
not guaranteed not to send them to the u.s.. to promote a new book he has written, he speaks out. >> the swedish government refuses to behave in a way that is at all normal, rational, were reasonable. that is why i have been granted political asylum. >> they say he must face questioning. they are outside the embassy 24 hours a day, waiting to arrest him the moment he walked out. it has cost 21 million pounds and counting. he is reported to be eating a lot of take away food, running on a treadmill and using a special lamp to get vitamin d. he appeared in robust health despite suggestions that he is suffering from a chronic lung condition. he did not like being asked about it. >> they never cared about my health when i was in prison or under two years of house arrest and cares about my health now because this building is surrounded by police and i will be forced out. >> it is hard to see how this standoff will end. central london. >> still to come on tonight's program, hours away from inaugurating a new president, we take a closer look at the man poised to leave mexico. now to a sunken treasure th
in syria are accelerating. she also joined the u.s. defense secretary in expressing concern that damascus is considering using chemical weapons against the rebels. >> i think there is no question that we remain very concerned, very concerned. as the opposition advances, in particular on damascus, the regime might very well consider the use of chemical weapons. >> secretary panetta went on to say that the white house made it clear there will be consequences should the assad regime make the mistake of using those weapons on its own people. for more on the perspective from damascus, i spoke a short time ago to the bbc's jeremy bolon -- jeremy bowen. >> the issue has been pretty firm on the use of chemical weapons. any news from damascus? >> i think the regime here can feel the pressure. it has been under huge pressure in the last couple of weeks, increasing pressure. of the most pressure has faced from the west, certainly, in the almost two years this has been going on. i spoke before panetta made his remarks to the information minister and he repeated one of their official positions, which
have an issue. that is with the u.s. and turkey and others are worried at seizing it before it happens, because otherwise we will have al qaeda an-- >> i don't disagree. there will be international action taken, no question about it. >> on this one we cannot lead from behind. we will have to lead from a head. >> i want to talk about 2016. that's right, 2016. >> i am still convinced that the overwhelming majority of our people want what my parents had, a chance. >> that is senator marco rubio of florida, one of the leading contenders, among the chattering classes anyway, for the 2016 republican presidential nomination, along with paul ryan. among the democrats, a lot of talk about hillary clinton. is rubio trying to redefine the republican party, colby? ->> he is trying to put distance between himself and what their standard bearer did with the 47% in being the plutocrat and showing he was completely in balti have any -- completely unable to have any impact on people different from himself because he cannot understand them. they are trying to show is another side to it it is early, and
that can fit those criteria. >> how much support you think the u.s. is giving those groups at the moment? >> it is my understanding is fairly modest. it is mostly nonlethal aid. with few exceptions, i do not think the problem facing the opposition is lack of arms. they have captured a lot. there have been some defections, so while they could probably use anti armor and anti helicopter tight arms, they have more than enough. i think it is more the organization and their leadership, and that is where training and advice they might be more important than furnishing specific armaments. >> thank you. in defiance of international warnings, north korea has gone away with successful -- gone ahead with successful rocket launches. pyongyang says it was to put the satellite in orbit, but the un says it was a missile test. --northcom rihanna's rocket north. 's rocket. it rose to -- north korea's rocket. it rose in defiance. the north hailed this as a great achievement. this is a country where many go hungry for lack of food, but today they've had a street party to celebrate. from its launch pad, the
Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)